Archivos para 17/08/16

Blood in Honduras, Silence in the United States

Honduran indigenous and environmental rights leader Berta Cáceres, who was assassinated by masked gunmen in the spring, had long lived under the shadow of threats, harassment, and intimidation. The slain leader of the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) was gunned down in her home in La Esperanza on March 3 after months of escalating threats. She was killed, it appears, for leading effective resistance to hydroelectric dam projects in Honduras, but she understood her struggle to be global as well. For Cáceres, the fight to protect the sacred Gualcarque River and all indigenous Lenca territory was the frontline in the battle against the unbridled transnational capitalism that threatens her people. She felt that as goes the Gualcarque River, so goes the planet. Her assassination sent shockwaves through the Honduran activist community: if an internationally-acclaimed winner of the Goldman Environmental Prize can be slain, there is little hope for anyone’s safety.

The Agua Zarca Dam, which put Cáceres in the crosshairs, is one of many to have been funded by foreign capital since the 2009 Honduran military coup. The ousted president, Manuel Zelaya, had alarmed the country’s elites—and their international allies—with his support of agrarian reforms and increased political power for laborers and the disenfranchised. After his removal, the Honduran government courted investors, declaring in 2011 that Honduras was “open for business.” Among the neoliberal reforms it undertook, which included gutting public services and cutting subsidies, the government granted large mining concessions, creating a demand for energy that heightened the profitability of hydroelectric dam projects. The aggressive privatization initiatives launched the government on a collision course with indigenous and campesinocommunities, which sit atop rich natural resources coveted by investors. The ensuing conflicts between environmentalists, traditional landowners, and business interests have often turned lethal.

These killings have taken place in a climate of brutal repression against labor, indigenous, and LGBTI activists, journalists, government critics, and human rights defenders. Cáceres, a formidable and widely respected opposition leader, was a particularly jagged thorn in the side of entrenched political and economic powers. Miscalculating the international outcry the murder would incite, Honduran officials at first couldn’t get their story straight: Cáceres’s murder was a robbery gone wrong, perhaps, or internal feuding within her organization, or a crime of passion. However, activists within and outside Honduras have successfully resisted all efforts to depoliticize Cáceres’s killing.

“It’s like going back to the past,” she said. “We know there are death squads in Honduras.”

Unfortunately, Cáceres’s death was not the first violent assault on COPINH leaders, nor has it been the last. In 2013 unarmed community leader Tomás García was shot and killed by a soldier at a peaceful protest. Less than two weeks after Cáceres was murdered, COPINH activist Nelson García was also gunned down, and just last month, Lesbia Janeth Urquía, another COPINH leader, was killed. Honduran authorities quickly arrested three people for Urquía’s murder, characterizing it as a familial dispute, but members of COPINH dispute this. “We don’t believe in this [official] version,” Cáceres’s successor, Tomás Gómez Membreño, told the Los Angeles Times. “In this country they invent cases and say that the murders have nothing to do with political issues. The government always tries to disconnect so as to not admit that these amount to political killings.”

Urquía was murdered soon after an explosive report in The Guardian in which a former member of the Honduran military said Cáceres’s name was at the top of a “hit list” of activists targeted for killing. The list, he said, was circulated among security forces, including units trained by the United States. The Honduran government vehemently denies these claims, despiteevidence supporting many of the allegations. Cáceres had previously said she was on a list of targeted activists. At a U.S. congressional briefing in April, Honduran human rights activist Bertha Oliva Nativí testified that activists had not faced such dangers since the 1980s. “Now, it’s like going back to the past,” she said. “We know there are death squads in Honduras.”

After an initial investigation into Cáceres’s murder that was tainted by multiple missteps, officials arrested four suspects, including an active member of the military, and later detained a fifth man. But many believe that the orders for her murder were issued higher up the chain of command, and that the government cannot be trusted to police itself. However, state officials have refused calls for an independent international investigation.

Nonetheless the United States continues to send Honduras security assistance that aids the government in militarizing the “war on drugs” and enforcing the aggressive neoliberal policies Washington favors for the region. Some American lawmakers have been paying close attention, sending letters to the U.S. State Department expressing concern about the role of state security forces in human rights abuses. In a sign of increasing impatience with State Department inaction, Representative Hank Johnson of Georgia and other legislators introduced a bill in Congress on June 14, the Berta Cáceres Human Rights in Honduras Act, which seeks to suspend “security assistance to Honduran military and police until such time as human rights violations by Honduran state security forces cease and their perpetrators are brought to justice.” As the bill’s original cosponsors argued in an op-ed in The Guardian, “It’s even possible that U.S.-trained forces were involved in [Cáceres’s] death,” since “one suspect is a military officer and two others are retired military officers. Given this information, we are deeply concerned about the likely role of the Honduran military in her assassination, including the military chain of command.”

As the hit list story broke, State Department spokesperson John Kirby maintained at a June 22 press briefing that “there’s no specific credible allegations of gross violations of human rights” in Honduras. That assertion is contradicted by the State Department’s own 2015 human rights report on Honduras, which documented “unlawful and arbitrary killings and other criminal activities by members of the security forces,” findings echoed by the United NationsThe Guardian reported on July 8 that the State Department is reviewing the hit list allegations, repeating the claim that it had seen no credible evidence to support them. U.S. ambassador to Honduras James Nealon told the Guardian, “We take allegations of human rights abuses with the utmost seriousness. We always take immediate action to ensure the security and safety of people where there is a credible threat.” Under the Leahy Law, the State Department and the Department of Defense are prohibited from providing support to foreign military units when there is credible evidence of human rights violations. Yet the mechanics of compliance with the Leahy law are shrouded by state secrecy, making it difficult to have confidence in the legitimacy of an investigation into the conduct of a close ally. And satisfying Leahy law obligations alone is insufficient. Half of the $750 million in aid that Congress approved in December for Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador comes through the Plan of the Alliance for the Prosperity in the Northern Triangle, a package of security and development aid aimed at stemming immigration from Central America. And disbursement of that money is conditioned merely on the Secretary of State certifying that the governments are making effective progress toward good governance and human rights goals.

In the aftermath of Zelaya’s removal, Secretary of State Clinton helped cement the post-coup government.

This is not the first time the Obama administration has undermined human rights in Honduras. In the aftermath of Zelaya’s removal, then Secretary of State Hillary Clinton helped cement the post-coup government. Cáceres herself denounced Clinton’s role in rupturing the democratic order in Honduras, predicting a dire fallout. As historian Greg Grandin told Democracy Now, “It was Clinton who basically relegated [Zelaya’s return] to a secondary concern and insisted on elections, which had the effect of legitimizing and routinizing the coup regime and creating the nightmare scenario that exists today.”  The election held in November 2009 was widely considered illegitimate.

When questioned by Juan González during a meeting with the New York Daily News editorial board in April, Clinton said that Washington never declared Zelaya’s ouster a coup because doing so would have required the suspension of humanitarian aid. In so doing, she relied on the technicality that an aid cutoff is triggered by the designation of a military coup. Therefore the term was never officially used, despite the military’s clear involvement in removing Zelaya from the country. Clinton claimed the legislature and judiciary had a “very strong argument that they had followed the Constitution and the legal precedents,” despite nearly universal condemnation of the coup, including by the United Nations, the European Union, and the Organization of American States. And Clinton’s account is contradicted by then U.S. ambassador to Honduras Hugo Llorens, who concluded in a leaked cable “there is no doubt” that the ouster of Zelaya “constituted an illegal and unconstitutional coup,” a characterization repeated by the State Department many times. Yet the administration stalled the suspension of aid to Honduras, in contrast to much quicker cutoffs following coups in Mauritania (August 2008) and Madagascar (March 2009).

The dire human rights situation in Honduras may receive more attention following Clinton’s selection of Tim Kaine as her running mate. The Virginia senator, who touts the nine months he spent in Honduras as a Jesuit volunteer as a formative experience, has added his voice to those pressuring Secretary of State John Kerry for a thorough investigation into Cáceres’s death. But Grandin argues that Kaine “has consistently supported economic and security policies that drive immigration and contribute to the kind of repression that killed Cáceres.” This critique of U.S. economic policy was recently echoed by one of Cáceres’s four children, Laura Zuñiga Cáceres, who joined a caravan from Cleveland to Philadelphia demanding justice for her mother. She was among those protesting outside the Democratic National Convention, linking Washington’s trade policy with the misery it engenders in Honduras. “We know very well the impacts that free trade agreements have had on our countries,” Zuñiga said. “They give transnational corporations, like the one my mom fought against, the power to protect their profits even if it means passing over the lives of people who defend the water, forest and mother earth from destruction caused by their very own megaprojects.”

Washington is again signaling to Honduras that stability and its own self-interest trump human rights concerns. Historically the United States has been agonizingly slow to cut off support for repressive Latin American governments so long as they advance its geopolitical and economic agenda. But there have been pivotal moments in history when the tide has turned against U.S.-allied repressive states, such as the killing of Jesuit priests in El Salvador in 1989, which spurred international condemnation of the Salvadoran government and prompted Washington to rethink its support. The death of Cáceres should be one of those moments. This time, Washington should act quickly to stop its money from funding human rights abuses in Honduras before more blood is spilled.

Origen: https://bostonreview.net/world-us/lauren-carasik-blood-honduras-silence-united-states

, , , ,

Deja un comentario

ALERTA: POLICÍA HONDUREÑA AGREDE POR SEGUNDA VEZ A PERIODISTA

El Comité  por la Libre Expresión (C-Libre) de Honduras ha enviado una ALERTA a Honduras y a la comunidad internacional ante el ataque de miembros de la Policía Preventiva contra el periodista Rogelio Trejo Paz, que labora para la corporación televisora Hable Como Habla (HCH).

Redacción Central / EL LIBERTADOR

Tegucigalpa. Un grupo policial de la patrulla PN035 de Choloma en el departamento de Cortés, asignados a esta unidad la noche del sábado, agredieron al periodista Rogelio Trejo Paz.

“Me vale verga”, dijo el policía que lo atacó físicamente cuando el periodista manifestó que lo denunciaría. El otro agente, en vez de intervenir para que respetaran la labor periodística, permaneció impasible.

En su muro de Facebook, el periodista denunció el domingo que la noche del sábado fue atacado por un oficial de apellido Martínez Sierra de la Policía Preventiva, asignado a la UMEP No. 10, de Choloma, en la Costa Norte de Honduras.

«De manera agresiva y usando la fuerza desproporcionada en contra de mi persona. Estamos de acuerdo el policía tienes sus funciones como tal. Igual el caso de nosotros, hacemos nuestro trabajo. Por favor, no podemos permitir este tipo de atropellos. Compartamos esto para que no sigamos sometidos. Por algunos uniformados que lo que hacen es desprestigiar la institución. Compartamos esta publicación», pidió el periodista.

Trejo Paz, por vía telefónica, contó en el canal  Hable Como Hable, donde trabaja, que es la segunda vez que sufre una agresión como esta.

«En esta oportunidad nos encontramos con el oficial Martínez Sierra de manera muy imprudente y agresiva a la vez, llegó de esa manera a no permitirnos el paso, estábamos en  propiedad privada, si bien es cierto somos respetuosos de la escena del crimen, es la segunda vez que pasa esto. Hace seis u ocho meses, este oficial intentó agredir a Kelin Trejo, estaba asignado en la López Arellano, estábamos como a 50 metros de la escena y lo que no quería era que grabáramos».

Relató que la noche del sábado, el agente llegó de manera abrupta y agresiva, que estaba en un bordo por donde hay un alambre y el policía lo sacó por donde estaba la cinta para hacer creer que el periodista la había atravesado, según dijo.

El periodista expresó que el policía no quiso dialogar y destacó que no tiene nada en contra de la institución policial. Este ataque ocurrió es una zona oscura, las autoridades habían dado a conocer que había una persona fallecida atrás de Mall Las Américas en Choloma.

El director del Canal Hable Como Habla (HCH), Eduardo Maldonado, una de las radiodifusoras con mayor audiencia en Honduras, denunció ayer que el corresponsal de la Costa Norte, Rogelio Trejo, sufrió el ataque mientras daba cobertura a una escena del crimen.

Maldonado dijo este domingo, «condenamos esta acción de este miembro de la policía y desde luego, vamos a actuar como corresponde legalmente por su manera de actuar contra nuestro periodista Rogelio Trejo».

«Todos lo que  conocemos sabemos que es un periodista serio, responsable, de pocas palabras y serio en la cobertura noticiosa, rechazamos esta acción de este miembro de la institución policial no actuó de manera correcta, no hizo lo que debe hacer un policía, no hizo lo que debió hacer».

Lo lamentable es que los demás miembros de la policía en vez de actuar para evitar esta situación permitieron que actuara salvajemente en contra de Rogelio Trejo, así fuera bueno que actuaran en contra de los criminales, pero con la población que delinque no actúan así, opinó Maldonado.

La Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos ha dicho que  «instruir adecuadamente a las fuerzas de seguridad del Estado sobre el rol de la prensa en una sociedad democrática constituye un paso importante para prevenir la violencia contra periodistas y trabajadores de medios de comunicación».

«Por este motivo, la Relatoría Especial ha recomendado que los Estados adopten mecanismos de prevención adecuados para evitar la violencia contra quienes trabajan en medios de comunicación, incluida la capacitación de funcionarios públicos, en especial las fuerzas policíacas y de seguridad y si fuere necesario, la adopción de guías de conducta o directrices sobre el respeto de la libertad de expresión. Esto reviste particular importancia para las fuerzas que desempeñan tareas de seguridad pública en las cuales habitualmente están en contacto con medios de prensa que informan sobre sus actividades, sobre todo cuando la fuerza en cuestión no fue capacitada originalmente para estas tareas de seguridad pública».

Origen: http://www.web.ellibertador.hn/index.php/noticias/nacionales/1637-alerta-policia-hondurena-agrede-por-segunda-vez-a-periodista

, , , ,

Deja un comentario

SIN RESPUESTAS CONCRETAS DE LA OIT, QUERELLA DEL MAGISTERIO

La Organización Internacional del Trabajo de Las Naciones Unidas, resolvió este pasado mes de julio, una serie de demandas por parte del magisterio hondureño, ordenando al Estado de Honduras entregar más información concerniente a los derechos de los trabajadores de la educación. Las demandas del magisterio se enmarcan en un largo conflicto entre las organizaciones […]

Origen: http://elpulso.hn/sin-respuestas-concretas-de-la-oit-querella-del-magisterio/

, , ,

Deja un comentario

En marco de foro internacional balacean campesino en Tegucigalpa

Por Redacción CRITERIO redaccion@criterio.hn Tegucigalpa.-En el marco del Foro Internacional contra la criminalización de los campesinos la noche de este martes ha sido atacado a balazos el dirigente campesino del departamento de La Paz, Carlos Geovany López. La información fue brindada por el diputado de Libre y coordinador de la Vía Campesina en Honduras, Pedro […]

Origen: En marco de foro internacional balacean campesino en Tegucigalpa – CRITERIO

, , , , ,

Deja un comentario

Iglesia debe condenar más de 200 crímenes de la diversidad sexual y dejar de hacer imperios

Origen: Iglesia debe condenar más de 200 crímenes de la diversidad sexual y dejar de hacer imperios

, , , , ,

Deja un comentario

Foro por la Unidad Popular se realiza en Tegucigalpa, Honduras

Por: Redacción CRITERIO redaccion@criterio.hn

Tegucigalpa. Los dias 16 y 17 de agosto Tegucigalpa, la capital de Honduras, es la sede del primer Foro por la Unidad Popular enmarcado en la lucha por la tierra, el territorio y contra la criminalización social. El objetivo es demandar que se detenga en Honduras la impunidad, criminalización y la […]

Origen: Foro por la Unidad Popular se realiza en Tegucigalpa, Honduras – CRITERIO

, ,

Deja un comentario

La MACCIH ya está investigando el megafraude al Seguro Social

Por: Redacción CRITERIO redaccion@criterio.hn Tegucigalpa.-El saqueo al Instituto Hondureño de Seguridad Social (IHSS) ya comenzó a ser investigado por la Misión de Apoyo Contra la Corrupción y la Impunidad en Honduras (MACCIH), al igual que otros casos emblemáticos. “Ya están trabajando, tengo entendido que han estado analizando los casos emblemáticos, algunos casos que nosotros hemos […]

Origen: La MACCIH ya está investigando el megafraude al Seguro Social – CRITERIO

, , , ,

Deja un comentario

CERCA DE UN SEGUNDO «ARROZAZO»?

Tegucigalpa, 16 de agosto. Pese a existir un acuerdo entre el gremio productor del arroz y autoridades de la Secretaría de Agricultura y Ganadería (SAG), los productores y agroindustriales del rubro arrocero continuaron denunciando esta semana que el gobierno persiste en su intención de importar sesenta mil toneladas (60,000) del producto básico, lo que sumado […]

Origen: http://elpulso.hn/cerca-de-un-segundo-arrozazo/

, ,

Deja un comentario

Coalición de Carolina del Norte apoya comunidad LGTBI de Honduras (video)

Por: Redacción CRITERIO redaccion@criterio.hn

Tegucigalpa.- La Coalición de Apoyo de Carolina del Norte, Estados Unidos de América, conformada por la iglesia Chapel Hill, y el Centro Hispano Durham entre otros viajaron a Honduras para manifestar su  apoyo a la comunidad LGTBI de este País Centroamericano. El reverendo David Mateo,  de la iglesia Chapel Hill explica […]

Origen: Coalición de Carolina del Norte apoya comunidad LGTBI de Honduras (video) – CRITERIO

, ,

Deja un comentario

Denuncian a funcionarios y exdirectivos de ENEE por corrupción en represa Patuca

TEGUCIGALPA, HONDURAS El Consejo Nacional Anticorrupción (CNA), denunció hoy a directivos y exfuncionarios de la Empresa Nacional de Energía Eléctrica (ENEE) por supuestos actos ilícitos en la construcción de viviendas

Origen: Denuncian a funcionarios y exdirectivos de ENEE por corrupción en represa Patuca

, , ,

Deja un comentario

Corte Suprema de Justicia deja en un limbo el plebiscito sobre Reelección

No hubo consenso en la Corte Suprema de Justicia en torno al tema de la Reelección, mañana continuará el pleno entre magistrados.

Origen: Corte Suprema de Justicia deja en un limbo el plebiscito sobre Reelección

, , ,

Deja un comentario

Las Fuerzas Armadas actuarán en su momento: jefe del Estado Mayor

Por: Redacción CRITERIO redaccion@criterio.hn

Tegucigalpa.- En su momento las Fuerzas Armadas actuarán en torno a la alternabilidad en el poder, advirtió este martes el jefe del Estado Mayor Conjunto de las Fuerzas Armadas de Honduras, general Francisco Isaías Álvarez. Sobre las visitas que han estado recibiendo por parte de políticos de la oposición y organizaciones […]

Origen: Las Fuerzas Armadas actuarán en su momento: jefe del Estado Mayor – CRITERIO

Deja un comentario

POLICÍAS CANCELADOS HAN RECIBIDO MÁS DE 86 MILLONES DE LEMPIRAS

Eso les ha pagado el Estado de Honduras en pago de prestaciones e indemnizaciones laborales. La Comisión Depuradora del cuerpo policial ha respetado el goce de derechos laborales a policías separados por reestructuración y de forma voluntaria. El 25 por ciento de la alta oficialidad ha sido separada de la institución policial, según informes oficiales.

Redacción Central / EL LIBERTADOR

Tegucigalpa. Son cerca de 86 millones de lempiras los que se han pagado en concepto de prestaciones e indemnizaciones laborales a los miembros de la institución policial que han sido cancelados de sus cargos por la Comisión Especial para el proceso de depuración y transformación de la Policía Nacional.

Omar Rivera, miembro de la Comisión confirmó que “hasta la fecha se han pagado más de 86 millones de lempiras por concepto de indemnizaciones, prestaciones laborales y derechos adquiridos“.

No obstante, Rivera aclaró que únicamente se le paga sus derechos a quien se le excluye de la estructura gubernamental, sin que medie causa imputable al policía, es decir a aquellos que han sido separados bajo la figura de reestructuración o mediante retiro voluntario.

En relación a los policías vinculados a algún acto irregular, Rivera apuntó que “se ha seguido el procedimiento y esos son cancelados, pero habiendo causal imputable a ellos en los cuales pierden su derecho, la Secretaría de Seguridad procede a la cancelación”.

El decreto 21-2016 que da vida a la Comisión Especial de Depuración de la Policía Nacional, autoriza a la Secretaría de Finanzas para crear la partida presupuestaria correspondiente para el pago de los pasivos laborales de los policías que son cancelados.

Al Poder Ejecutivo se le autoriza, además, establecer convenios de pago para el reconocimiento y pago de derechos laborales y prestaciones sociales en el caso de retiro voluntario.

En cuatro meses de trabajo, la Comisión Depuradora de la Policía Nacional ha evaluado a 947 uniformados, de los cuales 351 han sido separados de sus funciones, lo que representa el 37% del total.

En este primer ejercicio de evaluación policial de la alta oficialidad se generó la salida del 25% de la cúpula policial.

Origen: http://www.web.ellibertador.hn/index.php/noticias/nacionales/1636-policias-cancelados-han-recibido-mas-de-86-millones-de-lempiras

, , ,

Deja un comentario

Hondureño acusado de asesinar a defensor de los Gutiérrez a punto de saber si es enjuiciado

TEGUCIGALPA, HONDURAS El hondureño Rigoberto Andrés Paredes compareció este marte en los juzgados penales hondureños, acusado por el asesinato de Eduardo Montes, apoderado legal de la ex vicepresidenta del Parlamento,

Origen: Hondureño acusado de asesinar a defensor de los Gutiérrez a punto de saber si es enjuiciado

, , ,

Deja un comentario

Asesinatos de miembros LGTBI en Honduras no son investigados

Por: Redacción CRITERIO redaccion@criterio.hn

Tegucigalpa.- Rihanna Ferrera, de la comunidad LGTBI de Tegucigalpa, Honduras relata que la situación de violación a sus derechos humanos así como la criminalización y los asesinatos los tienen bastante preocupados y preocupadas porque no ven ninguna acción del gobierno por frenar las violaciones,  la criminalización y los asesinatos de los […]

Origen: Asesinatos de miembros LGTBI en Honduras no son investigados – CRITERIO

, , ,

Deja un comentario

Estado de Honduras confisca propiedades a exgerente de Hondutel

TEGUCIGALPA, HONDURAS Los bienes del exgerente de la Empresa Hondureña de Telecomunicaciones (Hondutel), Marcelo Chimirri, fueron confiscados por Estado de Honduras. Según el informe leído por el portavoz del MP,

Origen: Estado de Honduras confisca propiedades a exgerente de Hondutel

,

Deja un comentario